Month: August 2013

Incidence of the piriformis syndrome in patients with sacroiliac dysfunction

POSTER FOR THE SPINE & PERIPHERAL NERVES SECTION OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF NEUROLOGICAL SURGEONS.

Michael A. Amaral, MD, FACS; Alan B. Lippitt, MD; Vicki Sims, PT.

Background:

Sacroiliac dysfunction accounts for about 15% of low back pain patients. The pain is typically posterior, in the area of the sacroiliac joint. It may irradiate in the groin and toward the knee. A subset of patients also presents with sciatica-like pain which, to date, has remained unexplained. The diagnosis is usually made by a fluoroscopically guided sacroiliac intra-articular block. An improvement of 75% or better is considered diagnostic while an improvement of 50% to 74% is considered equivocal. Responses below 50% generally rule out this diagnosis. Read More

Pelvic Girdle Instability: Identification of Symptomatology

Vicki Sims, P.T.

Alan Lippitt, M. D.

David Mesnick, P.T.

 

Introduction

Lower back pain (LBP) is a 50 billion-dollar per year growth industry in our society (Graves et al, 1990).  The frequency of back pain is such that in the United States alone there are seven million people off work because of it at any one time.  In fact, the most common cause of occupational disability is, indeed, lower back pain (McKenzie, 1981).

While there has been considerable research directed toward identifying the etiology of LBP, only syndromes that are associated with neurologic compression of the nerve roots are well understood by clinicians.  It has been estimated that a precise diagnosis is unknown in 80-90% of patients with LBP (Richardson and Inglarsh, 1994). Read More